Ten countries for Filipinos to migrate to

Ever wanted to migrate to another country? Here are your best options!

The Philippines has been going through pretty tough days lately with our leaders slutshaming each other instead of doing their jobs properly and the police paying too much attention to only one aspect of the criminal activities in our country. Throw in the fact that our economy isn’t really that promising unless you’re a wealthy person living in Makati, BGC or Davao.

Sometimes you think, “what if I just migrate already?”. Well you know what? There is no shame in that. There is nothing wrong with considering to migrate. It’s not going to make you less of a Filipino (but denying you’re Filipino after you’ve migrated does).

If you are seriously thinking of migrating, this list has you covered with the ten countries you should consider migrating to. The criteria we used to form this list are the following: (1) Status of the country’s economy, (2) The country’s willingness to accept immigrants and (3) the size of the Filipino community in the country. The list is divided by continent.

Asia

Singapore

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As of 2013, 203,243 Filipinos make up the population of Singapore. Most of these Filipinos are Permanent Residents who came to Singapore to seek employment. There are three possible ways to migrate to Singapore as a Filipino. The first being as an exchange student as the National University of Singapore, for example, holds exchange program partnerships with major Philippine universities. The second is through being employed by a Multinational Company that operates in the Southeast Asian region and the third is being employed through a recruitment agency which is the most common route that Filipinos take in order to migrate to Singapore.

Singapore of course, is blessed with a thriving economy and as of the year 2014, their estimated nominal GDP is at $82,762 per capita. They also score high on the Human Development Index at 0.912.

The city-state is considered as the Canada of Southeast Asia due to the encouragement of multiculturalism back there (although there have been reports of anti-Filipino sentiment but it is not to an alarming degree). In fact, Singapore has not one but four official languages – English, Malay, Mandarin and Tamil – so if you are proficient in any of those languages, it’s an advantage for you!

Note: If you are considering on upgrading your permanent residency to a citizenship, Singapore does not honor dual citizenship so it means you’d need to revoke your Philippine citizenship when you get your Singaporean citizenship.

South Korea

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59,839 Filipinos make up the population of South Korea as of 2013 and like Singapore, most of the Filipinos who migrate to South Korea do so for the purpose of employment. While South Korea is not really a popular destination for immigration, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider migrating there. The demand for English teachers is getting increasingly popular in South Korea so you can definitely have a shot at getting employed in the country if you are good with the language. It is also possible to migrate to South Korea as an exchange student as various major universities in South Korea hold exchange student partnerships with major universities here in the Philippines.

South Korea’s nominal GDP as of 2013 is at $28,232 per capita while they score high on the Human Development Index at 0.898.

In terms of multiculturalism, it is not that big in South Korea as compared to Singapore but that shouldn’t discourage you to migrate to the country as South Koreans are slowly warming up to multiculturalism.

Note: If you are considering on upgrading your permanent residency to a citizenship, South Korea does not honor dual citizenship so it means you’d need to revoke your Philippine citizenship when you get your South Korean citizenship.

Oceania

Australia

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As of the year 2013, Filipinos make up 397,982 of the population in Australia and this accounts for Australia being one of the most sought after countries by Filipinos in terms of migration. Many of our major universities give students the opportunity to go to Australia as exchange students which is a very good stepping stone for if you’re a student interested in migrating abroad to continue your studies. If it’s employment that you’re after, Australia also has many opportunities for Filipinos – whether you are to be employed through a recruitment agency or a multinational company. Multiculturalism of course, is strong in Australia as well so you need not worry about facing heavy amounts of racism back there.

The 2015 estimate of Australia’s nominal GDP is at $51,642 per capita and going further, they possess a very high Human Development Index as well at 0.935.

Lastly, Australia honors dual citizenship so if you’re not yet ready to let go of your Filipino citizenship but you want an Australian citizenship as well, it is possible.

New Zealand

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In 2013, the population of Filipinos living in New Zealand was at 39,091. An interesting fact is that Filipinos living in the country also have their own demonym which is Kiwipinos (coming from Kiwi which is the demonym for New Zealand and Filipinos, the demonym for the Philippines). Going further, many employment opportunities are available for Filipinos in New Zealand and apart from that, there are also opportunities for Filipinos to come there to pursue their studies as partnerships for exchanging students exist between major universities in New Zealand and the Philippines.

The estimated nominal GDP for New Zealand in 2016 is at $36,254 per capita while the country’s Human Development Index is at 0.913 which is a very high level.

New Zealand also honors dual citizenship so if you’re thinking of getting a citizenship to NZ but you’re still willing to keep your Filipino citizenship at the same time, it is possible.

Africa

South Africa

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As of 2008, Filipinos make up 2,200 of the population in South Africa. Most of the Filipinos who find employment in South Africa usually do so through recruitment agencies. It is also possible for a Filipino to come to South Africa as an exchange student although being an exchange student from the Philippines to South Africa is not so common.

The estimated nominal GDP of South Africa as of 2016 is at $13,921 per capita while the Human Development Index level of the country is at 0.666 which is on the medium range.

Note: If you are considering on upgrading your permanent residency to a citizenship, South Africa does not honor dual citizenship so it means you’d need to revoke your Philippine citizenship when you get your South African citizenship.

Europe

Norway

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As of 2013, 18,088 Filipinos make up the population of Norway. Most Filipinos find employment in Norway through recruitment agencies as well but it is also possible to migrate to Norway as an exchange student as there are universities in our country that maintain partnerships with Norwegian universities for exchange programs. Filipinos have made a mark in Norway, mostly in the maritime, healthcare, IT, business and entertainment industries.

The estimated nominal GDP for Norway in the year 2017 is at $72,046 per capita while the country scores at 0.944 in the Human Development Index, under the very high tier.

Note: If you are considering on upgrading your permanent residency to a citizenship, Norway does not honor dual citizenship so it means you’d need to revoke your Philippine citizenship when you get your Norwegian citizenship.

Denmark

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While there is no official record as to how much the Filipinos make up of Denmark’s population, there is a Filipino community in Denmark known as the “Filipino Association of Denmark” whose Facebook page has over 1,400 likes. Based on that, there are likely thousands of Filipinos in Denmark. Filipinos have also found success in Denmark whether they migrate the country as skilled or unskilled workers. It is also possible to migrate to Denmark as an exchange student as there are universities in that country that have exchange student partnerships with universities in the Philippines.

Denmark may be an attractive choice to millennials looking to migrate to a European country because this country boasts working environments that are relaxed yet development-oriented.

As of 2016, the country’s estimated nominal GDP is at $53,280 per capita while they have a rating of 0.923 on the Human Development Index, putting them under the very high tier.

Denmark also honors dual citizenship so if you’re thinking of getting a Danish citizenship but you’re still willing to keep your Filipino citizenship at the same time, it is possible.

United Kingdom

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There are 218,126 Filipinos that make up the population of the United Kingdom as of 2013. Filipinos who migrate to this country are usually employed on the healthcare and hospitality industries. Migrating as an exchange student to the United Kingdom is possible as many universities in the Philippines have partnerships with British universities for this. Multiculturalism is still prevalent in the United Kingdom in the midst of the rise of anti-immigrant sentiment in there. London and Scotland, in particular, are good places for you to settle in as they are one of the places in the UK that are welcoming to immigrants but most of the Filipino community in the UK are based in London.

The nominal GDP of the United Kingdom as of 2015 was at $43,771 per capita while they scored 0.907 on the Human Development Index, putting them on the very high bracket.

The United Kingdom also honors dual citizenship so if you’re thinking of getting a British citizenship but you’re still willing to keep your Filipino citizenship at the same time, it is possible.

America

United States

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Being home to 3,535,676 Filipinos as of 2013, the United States is no doubt, the country with the largest population of Filipinos living outside the Philippines. Filipinos who migrate to the United States have a wide array of options to make it big. Whether you aspire to be in the medical field or the culture and arts field, the United States has opportunities for you! Coming to the US as an exchange student? It’s very possible because most universities in the Philippines offer exchange programs to American universities.

If you’re planning to migrate to the US, your best options would be to migrate to the states of California, Hawaii, Alaska or New York because these are the states in the US with the highest Filipino populations. If you want to choose a state other than the suggested four, Michigan and Florida are also good states to consider.

As of 2016, the estimated nominal GDP for the United States is at $57,220 per capita while they have a Human Development Index rating of 0.915, putting them on the very high tier.

The United States also honors dual citizenship so if you’re thinking of getting an American citizenship but you’re still willing to keep your Filipino citizenship at the same time, it is possible.

Canada

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Home to 721,578 Filipinos as of the year 2013, Canada is another destination popular among Filipinos looking into migrating whether for education or employment. If you are migrating to Canada to pursue your studies, many universities in the Philippines have exchange programs that will give you the opportunity to study in Canada. On the other hand, if you plan to migrate to Canada in order to seek employment, many recruitment agencies as well as multinational corporations offer you the opportunity to do so.

Canada is another country where Filipinos can make it big in almost any field. In fact, Filipinos are more successful in Canada – for instance, it is only in Canada where a Filipino (born and raised in the Philippines in fact) managed to make his way into federal politics as a cabinet minister for the former Prime Minister Jean Chretien. The name of the Filipino-Canadian in question? Rey Pagtakhan.

If you are looking to migrate to Canada, Vancouver is the best place to settle in as the Filipino population is pretty high there. Toronto and Montreal are good places to settle in as well since the Filipino communities there are pretty visible.

Canada’s estimated nominal GDP stands at $40,409 per capita as of 2016 while they score at 0.913 on the Human Development Index which puts them on the high tier.

Canada also honors dual citizenship so if you’re thinking of getting a Canadian citizenship but you’re still willing to keep your Filipino citizenship at the same time, it is possible.

Now that you have this list of possible countries to migrate to…

It’s time to prepare the necessary paperwork that you need in order to start your migration process. Check the immigration websites for the countries you are looking into migrating to and most of all, when you’ve gotten to the migration part itself, never stop dreaming high and working hard because in the end, all the hard work will pay off for you and you’ll definitely be happy with your decision to migrate.

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2 thoughts on “Ten countries for Filipinos to migrate to

  1. Is it possible for me to migrate in the above mention countries that now I am 51 years old? Is there still opportunity for my age?

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    • We’re not immigration experts here but what we do know is that if you have relatives from any of those countries, your relatives there may petition you. Just to be sure, you should get in touch with firms specializing in migrating to another country (there’s a firm that specializes migration to Canada in SM Megamall, for example).

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